Living in Luxembourg

Starting off living in Luxembourg usually consists off buying a house and finding a job. Luckily fine and thorough state institutions make both of this things exceptionally easy.

Buying a House

After a short-lived drop in 2012, Luxembourg’s property market is surging again, amidst a recovering economy. During 2013, the average selling price of houses soared by 10.32%. There are no restrictions on buying property in Luxembourg, if you can afford it. Many people who work in Luxembourg choose to buy their house (as well as ordinary shopping) in neighbouring France or Belgium where the prices are lower – although the travelling expenses may be quite high.

Note that the administrative language is usually French, although English is widely spoken, so make sure you understand everything before you sign anything. These are the steps usually taken in buying property in Luxembourg:

  1. Find the property.
  2. Make an offer.
  3. If the seller agrees, a sales contract is drawn up with the terms. This is binding on both parties. Oral contracts are accepted (but you may prefer to have it in writing).
  4. The transfer must be registered to be legally enforceable and to protect your house from third parties.
  5. Certified deeds are registered, the sale must also be recorded in a notarial deed. The notary has to ensure the deed is registered at the mortgage registry.
  6. You pay registration taxes and other fees.

The transaction costs include all costs of buying and then re-selling a property – lawyers’ fees, notaries’ fees, registration fees, taxes, agents’ fees, etc. The total costs come to between 12 and 17% of the purchase price. It usually costs more than you expect, so check your finances carefully. Currency rates will affect you the following website may save you money: www.smartcurrencyexchange.com

Finding Job in Luxembourg

Your ability to find work depends upon your language skills. English is a bonus, but you need to be fairly fluent in French or German. French is the official language of commerce, German is very similar to Luxembourgish.

To find a job, register with the National Employment Administration (ADEM). You will be helped by an “advisor-recruiter” and have access to certain ADEM tools, a right to social protection and unemployment benefits. However, you need to live in Luxembourg, have a social security number, have a residence permit and be able and willing to accept an appropriate job. You must attend any job interviews arranged through ADEM. Ultimately it’s not so hard to make living in Luxembourg.

Since the European Parliament and the European Union are both partly in Luxembourg, you might think it easy to find a job within these institutions — but it isn’t. You need to pass a series of examinations even to become listed on a reserve list. The process takes around a year and a job is not guaranteed after this.

Jobs are advertised in the national press, on private internet sites like www.jobs.lu and www.monster.lu and on big company websites. You will find temporary work online and there are openings for nannies advertised in corner shops. If you register with an employment agency you will need a CV, photo and copy of your ID.

Check the prices of removals to Luxembourg.

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