Living in Sweden

Cost of living in Sweden is rather simillar to what you’re used to in UK. Except for groceries, which are much more expensive and rent prices which are significantly lower in Sweden.

Buying a house in Sweden

In 2013, Sweden’s housing market recorded its strongest performance in three years, although economic growth was slow. In Sweden there are no legal restrictions for foreigners buying property.

It can be easy and fast to buy in Sweden; the process of registration may take as little as five weeks to complete. Usually a broker’s or an agent’s services suffices. It may not be necessary to involve a lawyer.

These are the steps you need to take:

  1. Validate the deeds
  2. Survey the property
  3. Negotiate a purchase price
  4. Sign the purchase agreement (buyer and seller)
  5. Pay a deposit (2-1%)
  6. Buyer and seller meet to transfer the property and formalise the agreement, dealing with any loans, insurances, rents or service charges.
  7. Complete payment
  8. Seller issues a bill of sale (money paid and transfer of title completed)
  9. The buyer forwards the bill of sale to the Land Registration Authority. The state confirms this.

The costs are quite low, with stamp duty, the registration fee and agent’s fee together coming to between 7.26 and 9.26%.

 

removals to Sweden

 

You may find this website useful: http://www.globalpropertyguide.com/Europe/Sweden/Buying-Guide

Working in Sweden

You can live and work in Sweden without a visa or work permit. That is thanks to The European Free Movement of Workers agreement.

Your ability to find work depends upon your language skills. English is a bonus, but it helps to be fairly fluent in Swedish. If you are moving for employment, the administrative details may be handled by the employer, who is also responsible for paying your taxes. It is wise to get a written contract if possible. A verbal contract gives little protection.

Work in Sweden has a philosophy that there should be a healthy balance between work and family. Informal coffee breaks to chat to the boss and meeting the children from school are seen as normal behaviours. Of course you have to make up the hours at other times, but on the whole there is a more flexible arrangement in work than in the UK.

At this website (http://work.sweden.se) you can get all the information you require to work in Sweden including a pdf booklet.

Articles about living in Sweden

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